Mar
27
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Alison Conner

Alison W. Conner
Professor of Law & Director of International Programs
William S. Richardson School of Law
University of Hawai'i at Manoa

Monday, March 27, 2017
12:15-2:00 pm
Vanderbilt Hall, Room 208
40 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012
R.S.V.P. Here

 


Alison Conner is professor of law and director of the international and graduate programs at the Richardson School of Law.  She taught at the National University of Singapore Faculty of Law and the University of Hong Kong (1984-95) before joining the University of Hawai`i in 1995.  She has also taught at Nanjing University (1983-84) and Tsinghua University (2004) as a Fulbright Professor and at Tongji University (2014 & 2015) in Hawaii’s study abroad program.  In 2016 she was a visiting scholar at the National Taiwan University and then returned to HKU for a semester as a visiting fellow.
 
Professor Conner’s research interests include legal history, but more recently she has focused on the depiction of law in Chinese movies.  She has written about divorce in Chinese movies (“Don’t Change Your Husband”), critiques of the legal system in early movies (“Movie Justice”), a late 1940s lawyer-hero (“The Lawyer Who Haunts Us: Yin Zhaoshi and the Bright Day”), trials in Xie Jin’s movies (“Images of Justice and Injustice”), Raj Kapoor’s popular movie (“Trials and Justice in Awaara: A Postcolonial Movie on Post-Revolutionary Screens”), and a 1980 example of scar cinema that stresses the importance of law (“Law and Justice in Evening Rain”).
 

Mar
29
2:45 pm14:45

Visiting Scholar Workshop: Takeharu Kato

Visiting Scholar Workshop
139 Macdougal Street, NY, NY, 10033
5th Floor Conference Room
2:45-4:00 PM

Workshop subject:

"The difference between LGBT Discrimination in Japan and the US; and how to eliminate it through litigation and legislation"

Takeharu Kato

Mr. Takeharu Kato received a Bachelor’s degree from the Faculty of Law at Kyoto University. He has been a practicing lawyer in Japan since 2004 as a member of the Japan Federation of Bar Associations (JFBA). He specializes in Labor Law, Family Law and Criminal Law. Besides dealing with general civil cases such as labor related problems, divorce and inheritance as well as criminal cases, Mr. Kato is engaged in activities supporting the LGBT community. He is a member of the Legal Network for LGBT Rights, which is the only organization of legal specialists to protect the rights of LGBT people in Japan. He and other lawyers in this organization represent the LGBT community who wish to be married in Japan and submit petitions to the JFBA to make a request under the human rights remedy program in a bid to legalize same-sex marriages.


Mar
23
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Andrew Duncan


Andrew Duncan
Producer, Chairman of June Pictures 


Thursday, March 23, 2017
12:15-2:00 pm
Vanderbilt Hall, Room 202
40 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012
R.S.V.P. Here

 

Prior to founding June Pictures, Mr. Duncan had his own film and investment company called IGX LLC which initially started some of the projects that are now holdings of June Pictures.

Previously Mr. Duncan was Executive Vice President of Scalent Systems Inc., a data center virtualization based in Palo Alto, CA, until its sale to Dell Corporation in 2010. Prior to that Mr. Duncan held various senior management roles in both engineering and operations at Cassatt Corporation, EMC Corporation and Tektronix. Mr. Duncan began his career as a sportscaster at WGHP in Greensboro, N.C., and won a technical EMMY award while at Vinten Broadcast for the development of robotic pedestals for television studio cameras.

For the past five years, Mr. Duncan has been an invaluable advisor and strong financial supporter to the U.S.-Asia Law Institute. He also serves on the Board of Advisors of the New York Committee for Human Rights Watch and the Board of Visitors of Worcester Academy in Worcester, MA.
 

Mar
22
2:30 pm14:30

Visiting Scholar Workshop: Hirotoshi Uchiumi

Join us as the Visiting Scholars at the U.S.-Asia Law Institute present on their research.

Topic: 'Aggregate Dispute Resolution in U.S. and Japan’
Presenter: Hirotoshi Uchiumi
Location: 139 MacDougal Street, 5th Floor, Room 412, NY, NY, 10012
Email usali.nyu@gmail.com to RSVP


Hirotoshi Uchiumi

Hirotoshi Uchiumi is a Japanese law scholar, associate professor at Rikkyo University in Tokyo, who specializes in civil procedure and bankruptcy. He has published articles on a wide range of subjects. After attaining his JD degree at the University of Tokyo, he was appointed as a Research Associate at the University of Tokyo to work on Japanese and comparative civil procedure. Three years later, he was assigned as associate professor at Tohoku University, and moved to Rikkyo, where now he teaches. 

Mar
20
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Natalie Lichtenstein

Natalie Lichtenstein

Monday, March 20, 2017
12:15-2:00 pm
Vanderbilt Hall Room 208
40 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012
RSVP Required 


Natalie Lichtenstein is a U.S. lawyer who has specialized in legal issues at international financial institutions and legal development in China since the 1970s. Until August 2016, she served as the inaugural General Counsel at the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB). Prior to that, she served as the Chief Counsel for the establishment of AIIB, and the principal drafter for the AIIB Charter from 2014. Her work for AIIB drew on her 30-year career at the World Bank. Joining the legal department in 1980, she advised on lending operations in China and other countries for most of the next 20 years. She served as Chief Counsel, East Asia in the 1990s. She was an early leader in legal technical assistance activities. From 1999-2010, she served in senior positions, specializing in the Bank’s institutional governance issues and reforms, legal opinions and Board governance. She led the work on reforms to enhance voice and participation of developing countries in the World Bank Group, prior to her retirement from the World Bank in 2010. Early on in her career (1978-80), she was involved in legal aspects of US participation in international financial institutions as a lawyer at the US Treasury Department. There, she worked on normalization of relations between the US and the People’s Republic of China. Since 2007, she has offered a course on Law & Society in China at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC. She has also taught Chinese law at George Washington University Law School. Her consulting work for international organizations in China has included a review of the EU-UNDP Governance for Equitable Development Project and a report on Asian Development Bank’s Technical Assistance for Legal Development. She was appointed to the Advisory Board of the Duke-Kunshan University in May 2014, and is a member of the National Committee on US-China Relations.

Ms. Lichtenstein received her A.B. and J.D. degrees from Harvard University.

Please R.S.V.P. by Friday, March 17. Otherwise we cannot estimate the amount of food required. 
 

Mar
6
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Dan Zhou

Dan Zhou 
Lawyer and LGBT Rights Advocate

Monday, March 6, 2017
12:15-2:00 pm
Vanderbilt Hall Room 208
40 Washington Square Park
New York, NY 10012
RSVP Here

Born in January 1974, Mr. Dan Zhou is a practicing lawyer based in Shanghai, China. As one of the few Chinese LGBT people who have ever come out to the local, national and international media, he is a pioneering advocate for full and equal recognition of LGBT people’s rights in China. He has been working towards these goals through consulting services, public education, and public policy and legal advocacy in China over the past decade. In addition, he published, in 2009, Pleasure and Discipline: Jurisprudential Imagination of Same-sex Desire in the Chinese Modernity, the ground-breaking monograph in the Chinese language on the dynamics of same-sex desire, law and modernity in China.  Meanwhile, he speaks on LGBT rights issues at workshops, seminars and symposia in China, the United States, Germany, and other countries.

Mr. Zhou was profiled in the June 27, 2005 issue of TIME Magazine, in the September 7, 2005 issue of Southern People Weekly (Nan Fang Ren Wu Zhou Kan), in the September 30 issue of China Daily, and in the October 20, 2013 issue of South China Morning Post. In 2006, Equality Forum named Mr. Zhou the recipient of the “11th Annual International Role Model Award.” Equality Forum is a Philadelphia-based nonprofit organization whose mission is to advance national and international lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender civil rights through education. 

Mr. Zhou was a Visiting Scholar at the U.S.-Asia Law Institute and is now pursuing a S.J.D. degree at Harvard Law School. He is a dynamic, perceptive, and humorous speaker. We invite you to join us and check out usali.org for updates and upcoming events! 

Mar
2
4:00 pm16:00

Asia Law Society: A Conversation with Ma Ying-jeou, Taiwan's Former President

RSVP here

The U.S.-Asia Law Institute honored to co-host a conversation between former President of Taiwan Ma Ying-jeou and USALI Director Professor Jerome Cohen. Together they will reflect on the relationship between the US, Taiwan, and Mainland China— one of political nuance and global significance.

Ma Ying-jeou served as President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) from 2008 to 2016. His previous political roles include Taiwan's Justice Minister, Mayor of Taipei, and Chairman of the Kuomintang Party. President Ma is also an alumnus of NYU Law, completing his LLM at NYU in 1976 before receiving his SJD at Harvard Law School in 1981.

We are excited to extend an invitation to the entire NYU community. The conversation will be held on March 2, 4-5:55 pm in Furman Hall Room 216, 245 Sullivan St, New York, NY 10012

RSVP here

Feb
27
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Jerome A. Cohen

A Conversation with Professor Jerome A. Cohen
 

Monday, February 27, 2017
12:15-2:00 pm
Vanderbilt Hall, Room 208
40 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012
RSVP here
 

Prof. Jerome A. Cohen, a professor at NYU School of Law since 1990 and Faculty Director of its U.S.-Asia Law Institute, is a leading American expert on Chinese law and government. A pioneer in the field, Prof. Cohen began studying and teaching about China’s legal system in the early 1960s and from 1964 to 1979 introduced the teaching of Asian law into the curriculum of Harvard Law School, where he served as Jeremiah Smith Professor, Associate Dean and Director of East Asian Legal Studies. In addition to his responsibilities at NYU, Prof. Cohen served for several years as C.V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director of Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he currently is an Adjunct Senior Fellow. He retired from the partnership of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP at the end of 2000 after twenty years of law practice focused on China. In his law practice, Prof. Cohen represented many companies and individuals in contract negotiations as well as in dispute resolution in China.

Feb
27
10:00 am10:00

Saiban-in and Death Penalty in Japan

Our next Visiting Scholar Workshop Presentation will be next Monday! Please join us as we learn more about the “Saiban-in” (lay jury) system and Death Penalty in Japan from our Visiting Scholar Professor Takashi Maruta. We hope that all USALI Visiting Scholars can attend this event.

Details:

Monday, February 27, 10:00 AM
W
ilf Hall, 5th Floor Conference Room
139 MacDougal Street, 5th Floor

Bio:

Takashi Maruta
Professor Takashi Maruta teaches at Kwansei Gakuin University Law School, Nishinomiya, Japan. He obtained LL.M. Degree from the University of Michigan Law School and was visiting scholar at Harvard Law School and Columbia Law School. He taught Japanese Law at Michigan Law School, University of Hawaii School of Law, and Sussex University Law Centre of Sussex, England. Professor Takashi Maruta is known as a leading scholar of the jury system and an advocator and pioneer. Due to his effort, civil participation (Saiban-in-seido) was institutionalized into Japanese criminal procedure 10 years ago. He is also a practicing lawyer, handling both criminal trials and civil disputes in Kobe, Japan.  His research interests include comparative legal system, jury system in both civil and criminal field, and legal theory. He has also been trying to find a legal system capable of promoting a fair and democratic society in order to protect fundamental human rights. His most recent publication is a book co-authored with Matthew Wilson, Hiroshi Fukurai: Japan and Civil Jury Trials: The Convergence of Forces, Published by Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd, United Kingdom (2015).

Feb
22
4:00 pm16:00

USALI Visiting Scholar Workshop: Yan Xiang

Join us as the Visiting Scholars at the U.S.-Asia Law Institute present on their research.

Topic: Wrongful Convictions in China
Location: 139 MacDougal Street, 4th Floor, Room 412, NY, NY, 10012
Email usali.nyu@gmail.com to RSVP

Yan Xiang

Dr. Yan Xiang is an associate professor at Southwest University of Political Science and Law, with stints as a vising scholar at NYU Law and visiting fellow at Vera Institute of Justice. She holds a Ph.D. in procedural law from China University of Political Science and Law and a LL.M. degree from Southern Methodist University. Prior to teaching at SUPSL, she worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Institute of Law, Chinese Academy of Social Science. Her research interests include criminal procedure law, evidence and empirical methods. Dr. Xiang has published three books and more than 50 articles on such topics as privacy issues in criminal investigations, criminal mediation, search and seizure, forfeiture, evidence rules, and legal empirical methods. Her recent book Research on Criminal Economic Measures (2012) was granted the First Prize of the 4th Criminal Procedure Law Academic Research Award to Young Scholars, and the Third Prize of the 3rd Dong Biwu Legal Achievement Award to Young Scholars in 2015.

Feb
22
12:45 pm12:45

Business, Law, and Government in China: Reflections from Experience

Wednesday, February 22, 12:45-2:00 p.m.
Vanderbilt Hall, Greenberg Lounge

What lies ahead for US-China relations, especially in the business world? At this Forum, David Bonderman, Harvard Law '66, and Dick Cashin, two well-known investors with extensive experience doing business in China, offer their perspectives. Both are founders of investment firms, Bonderman of TPG, where he is chairman, and Cashin of One Equity Partners, where he is president. Professor of Law Jerome Cohen, Faculty Director of our US-Asia Law Institute and a leading expert on Chinese law and government, will moderate what should be a stimulating discussion, and audience members are encouraged to bring questions of their own. 

Panelists: 
David Bonderman, Founding Partner and Chairman, TPG
Dick Cashin, Founder and President, One Equity Partners
Jerome Cohen, Professor of Law and Faculty Director of US-Asia Law Institute, NYU School of Law

Click here to RSVP to this event.

Click here to view this event on the web calendar.

Feb
13
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Colin Jones

picture.png

Colin Jones
Professor, Doshisha Law School (Kyoto)
Visiting Professor, Duke Law School
Adjunct, Michigan State University


Monday, February 13, 2017
12:15 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Vanderbilt Hall, Room 208
40 Washington Square South, NY, NY 10012
R.S.V.P. is required.
Lunch will be served.

Colin P.A. Jones is a Professor at Doshisha Law School in Kyoto. He has also been a Visiting Professor at Duke Law School since 2015, and has taught as an adjunct for Michigan State University College of the Law since 2009. In the past he has also taught at Osaka University and University of Victoria, where he was a Japan Visiting Fellow at the Center for Asian Pacific Initiatives. He is also a Life Member of Clare Hall at the University of Cambridge, and has been a visiting fellow at the Asian Law Institute at National University of Singapore. He also remains active as a practitioner, working with global multinationals and technology start-ups and serving as a director for several corporations. He has also translated Japanese legal documents professionally since he was a student at Duke Law School, a role that saw him become involved in the US Supreme Court Case, Taniguchi v. Kan Pacific Saipan Ltd. (2012).

Having first gone to Japan to study in 1983, Professor Jones has spent much of his career as both a scholar and a lawyer in Japan and other parts of the Asia-Pacific region. His research is focused on comparative law, and he has published extensively on Japanese law in both English and Japanese. He has written four books in Japanese and writes "Law of the Land," a monthly column on Japanese law-related subjects in the Japan Times, the country's leading English daily newspaper. He is particularly well known for his work on Japanese family law and its impact on international divorce and child custody disputes. He has served as an expert witness in cross border family disputes in trials in Australia and US state and federal courts. He is qualified as a lawyer in New York, Guam and the Republic of Palau, and a certified mediator.

Please R.S.V.P. by Friday, February 10. Otherwise we cannot estimate the amount of food required. 

Colin P.A. Jones is a Professor at Doshisha Law School in Kyoto. He has
also been a Visiting Professor at Duke Law School since 2015, and has
taught as an adjunct for Michigan State University College of the Law
since 2009. In the past he has also taught at Osaka University and
University of Victoria, where he was a Japan Visiting Fellow at the
Center for Asian Pacific Initiatives. He is also a Life Member of Clare
Hall at the University of Cambridge, and has been a visiting fellow at
the Asian Law Institute at National University of Singapore. He also
remains active as a practitioner, working with global multinationals and
technology start-ups and serving as a director for several corporations.
He has also translated Japanese legal documents professionally since he
was a student at Duke Law School, a role that saw him become involved in
the US Supreme Court Case, Taniguchi v. Kan Pacific Saipan Ltd. (2012).

Having first gone to Japan to study in 1983, Professor Jones has spent
much of his career as both a scholar and a lawyer in Japan and other
parts of the Asia-Pacific region. His research is focused on comparative
law, and he has published extensively on Japanese law in both English
and Japanese. He has written four books in Japanese and writes "Law of
the Land," a monthly column on Japanese law-related subjects in the
Japan Times, the country's leading English daily newspaper. He is
particularly well known for his work on Japanese family law and its
impact on international divorce and child custody disputes. He has
served as an expert witness in cross border family disputes in trials in
Australia and US state and federal courts. He is qualified as a lawyer
in New York, Guam and the Republic of Palau, and a certified mediator.




Feb
6
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Charles Booth

Charles Booth
Director, Institute of Asian-Pacific Business Law (IAPBL)
William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Special Counsel, Sheppard Mullin
Senior Advisor, Burford Capital



Monday, February 6, 2017
12:15 a.m.-2:00 p.m., Vanderbilt Hall, Room 208
40 Washington Square South, NY, NY 10012

R.S.V.P. is required.
Lunch will be served.



Professor Booth (BA, Yale University, 1981, summa cum laude; JD Harvard Law School, 1984, cum laude) is a Professor of Law at the Richardson School of Law at the University of Hawai‘i and the Founding Director of the Institute of Asian-Pacific Business Law (IAPBL). He taught in the Faculty of Law at the University of Hong Kong from 1989 to 2005, where he also served as the Director of the Asian Institute of International Financial Law (AIIFL) from 2000-2005.
 
Professor Booth’s primary research interests are comparative and cross-border insolvency and commercial law, Hong Kong and Chinese insolvency law reform, and the development of insolvency and commercial law infrastructures in Asia. He has authored/co-authored more than 60 publications, which have been published in 11 jurisdictions. He co-authored: A Global View of Business Insolvency Systems (2010); the Hong Kong Corporate Insolvency Manual (3rd ed, 2015); and the Hong Kong Personal Insolvency Manual (2nd ed, 2010; 3rd ed, forthcoming 2017).


Please R.S.V.P. by Friday, February 3. Otherwise we cannot estimate the amount of food required. 


---
Announcements:
The U.S.-Asia Law Institute hosts a small number of outstanding foreign research scholars from Asia each year. Our Visiting Scholars include judges, prosecutors, lawyers, legal journalists, and legislators, as well as academics. Scholars are able to audit classes at NYU, use the NYU library and other resources and attend events at NYU while pursuing their own research goals and contributing to Institute research and projects. Our semi-monthly Visiting Scholar Workshop Series provides an opportunity for Visiting Scholars to share their work with experts from various fields. All Visiting Scholars are expected to participate in Institute events and to share the results of their research with the faculty, staff and other scholars at the Institute. Click here to learn more. 

Jan
26
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Manfred Nowak

Manfred Nowak
Professor of Law, University of Vienna

Thursday, January 26, 2017
12:15-2:00 p.m.
Vanderbilt Hall, Room 202
40 Washington Square South, NY, NY 10012

R.S.V.P. is required.
Lunch will be served.

Professor Manfred Nowak is one of the world’s leading experts on international human rights. He is Secretary General of the new European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation, was the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture who visited China and delivered a famous report on China’s criminal justice system some years ago, and is chair of the International Review Committee on Taiwan’s HR Progress. He is also a lively, dynamic speaker who should not be missed – a certifiable great person. This all comes up at the last moment because he is spending this week at the UN! Kindly R.S.V.P. if you wish to attend. 

Jan
23
5:30 pm17:30

[NCUSCR] The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom

  • NYU Law

RSVP (New Login needed) here. 

Although the contemporary U.S.-China relationship has grown out of Nixon and Kissinger’s visits to China in the 1970s, the foundations of Sino-American exchange are hundreds of years old. Since the establishment of the United States, missionaries, traders, scholars, and laborers have formed bridges between the two cultures, tracing familiar patterns of interaction that continue to play out today. As points of contact between the U.S. and China have proliferated over the last two centuries, the relationship has consistently been characterized by enormous promise and deep ambivalence.

John Pomfret, former reporter for The Washington Post, and a long-time resident of China, takes a new look at the long history of U.S.-China relations in his recent book, The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom: America and China, 1776 to the Present. He describes cycles of mutual understanding and collaboration, and bitter disappointment. As U.S.-China relations approach a new inflection point, Mr. Pomfret’s account of the history of the relationship provides illuminating perspectives on the present. On January 23, Mr. Pomfret will join the National Committee for a discussion of his book, his experiences living in China, and the future of the world’s most important bilateral relationship.  

 

Bio:

John Pomfret is an award-wining journalist and writer who has divided his time among the United States, China, Europe, Africa and the Middle East since the 1980s. He was one of the first Americans to study in China following the establishment of diplomatic relations, and was a correspondent in China for the Associated Press and The Washington Post for a total of seven years, first in the late 1980s and then again in the early 2000s. For the past five years, Mr. Pomfret has devoted himself to writing the first narrative history of America’s relationship with China from the 18th century to the present. He is also the author of the best-seller Chinese Lessons: Five Classmates and the Story of the New China (2007).

Mr. Pomfret now works as a consultant based in California. He frequently speaks about Chinese domestic politics and foreign policy, Chinese culture, marketing to the Chinese, and China’s environmental, demographic, and political challenges.

Jan
23
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Teng Biao

Celebrating China's 'Day of the Endangered Lawyers' with
Teng Biao
Visiting Fellow at U.S.-Asia Law Institute; Visiting Scholar at School of Social Science, Institute of Advanced Study; Founder and President of China Against the Death Penalty  

Other speakers:
Ira Belkin, Jerome A. Cohen, and Sida Liu


Monday, January 23, 2017
12:15-2:00 p.m.
Vanderbilt Hall, Room 208
40 Washington Square South, NY, NY 10012
R.S.V.P. is required.
Lunch will be served.

Dr. Teng Biao is an academic lawyer and a human rights activist. He was formerly a Lecturer in the China University of Political Science and Law, a visiting Fellow at Harvard Law School, Yale Law School, and the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Since 2003, Teng has provided counsel in numerous human rights cases, including those of rural rights advocate Chen Guangcheng, rights defender Hu Jia, the religious freedom case of Falungong, and numerous death penalty cases. He co-founded “Open Constitution Initiative” (Gongmeng) and is also the Founder and President of China Against the Death Penalty, Beijing. His research interest includes human rights, Constitutionalism, criminal justice, legal theory, democratic theory, transitional justice and social movement. Some of his articles and Op-eds (in English and Chinese) can be found at the following link: http://blog.boxun.com/hero/tengb/

Dec
15
4:00 pm16:00

50th Anniversary of the International Human Rights Covenants

  • 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS COVENANTS

A Celebration and Appraisal 

ROOSEVELT HOUSE PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE AT HUNTER COLLEGE

15 DECEMBER 2016  

Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute
47-49 E 65th Street (between Park & Madison Avenues)
Thursday, December 15, 2016
4:15pm Photo Exhibit & Coffee Reception
5pm Program
7pm Reception, sponsored by the Mission of Finland to the UN

CLICK HERE TO RSVP


On December 16, 1966, the UN General Assembly adopted the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). Together with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, these three documents comprise the International Bill of Human Rights, the universal standard to protect and promote human rights for everyone, everywhere.
Please join Roosevelt House, the Hunter College Human Rights Program, and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, in commemorating this 50th anniversary of the adoption of the Covenants. Two panels will explore in depth the development and impact of the treaties, and their value as tools for change. The event will also feature a preview of a photo exhibition illustrating the principles in the two Covenants.
Panel I: From Declaration to Covenants & the Quest for Universal

 

  • Blanche Wiesen Cook, CUNY Graduate Center; Eleanor Roosevelt biographer
  • Michael Posner, NYU Stern School of Business; former US Asst. Secretary of State
  • Jerome A. Cohen, NYU US-Asia Law Institute
  • Gay McDougall, Fordham Law School; former UN Independent Expert                              
  • Gerald Neuman, Harvard Law School; former Human Rights Committee member
  • Beth Simmons, University of Pennsylvania
  • Aisling Reidy, Human Rights Watch
  • Miloon Kothari, President, UPR Info; former UN Special Rapporteur
Dec
14
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Zhiyuan Guo

Zhiyuan Guo
Professor of Law at China University of Political Science and Law; Deputy Director of the Center for Criminal Law and Justice. 

Wednesday, December 14, 2016
12:15-2:00 p.m., Furman Hall, Room 120
245 Sullivan Street, NY, NY 10012

R.S.V.P. is required.
Lunch will be served.

Guo Zhiyuan is a Professor of Law at China University of Political Science and Law (CUPL) in Beijing, where she specializes in Criminal Procedure, Evidence, International Human Rights Law and Law and Society Studies. She is Deputy Director of the Center for Criminal Law and Justice, CUPL, Adjunct Professor at Buffalo State College, US and Chinese University of Hong Kong, she is also a Non-resident Senior Research Fellow at U.S.-Asia Law Institute, New York University School of Law. Guo was appointed as Guanghua Visiting Scholar at NYU School of Law from 2008-2009 and as Sohmen Visiting Scholar at Faculty of Law, Hong Kong University in 2011. She was appointed as Fulbright Research Scholar and visited Stanford Law School for the 2015-2016 academic year. Professor Guo has published extensively on academic journals in both Chinese and English languages. Her research interests include exclusionary rules of evidence, Plea Bargaining, Effective Counsel, and Criminal Mental Health Law.
 

Please R.S.V.P. by Friday, December 9. Otherwise we cannot estimate the amount of food required. 

Dec
5
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: David Law

David Law
Professor and Chair of Public Law at University of Hong Kong
Chair of Constitutional Law and Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis


Monday, December 5, 2016
12:15 a.m.-2:00 p.m., Vanderbilt Hall, Room 208
40 Washington Square South, NY, NY 10012

R.S.V.P. is required.
Lunch will be served.



David Law is the Sir Y.K. Pao Chair of Public Law at the University of Hong Kong and the Charles Nagel Chair of Constitutional Law and Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis. He teaches and writes in the areas of public law, comparative law (with a focus on Asia), legal globalization, judicial politics, and judicial behavior. His empirical scholarship on courts and constitutions employs a variety of approaches ranging from investigative fieldwork on foreign courts to “big data” methods involving the automated analysis of legal texts. His findings on the declining influence of the U.S. Constitution and other global constitutional patterns have featured on the front page of the New York Times and in a variety of international media. 

He holds a Ph.D. in political science from Stanford, a B.C.L. in European and Comparative Law from the University of Oxford, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. He served as a law clerk to Judge Stephen Reinhardt of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and has previously taught at the UCSD Department of Political Science; National Taiwan University College of Law (as a Fulbright Scholar); Seoul National University School of Law; Georgetown University Law Center; and Princeton University (as the Martin and Kathleen Crane Fellow in Law and Public Affairs). His current projects include the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Constitutional Law in Asia for Oxford University Press and a handbook for Edward Elgar Publishing entitled Research Methods in Constitutional Law.


Please R.S.V.P. by Thursday, December 1. Otherwise we cannot estimate the amount of food required. 

Dec
1
Dec 2

Jeffery Lehman

Thursday, December 1
Jeffrey Lehman
11:00-12:55 p.m., Furman Hall 120
245 Sullivan Steet, NY, NY 10012

 



Jeffrey Lehman is the Vice Chancellor of NYU Shanghai, where he oversees all academic and administrative operations. Lehman is an internationally acclaimed leader in higher education, having served as dean of the University of Michigan Law School, the eleventh president of Cornell University, and the founding dean of the Peking University School of Transnational Law.

Prior to joining the University of Michigan Law School, Lehman served as law clerk to Frank M. Coffin, Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and Associate Justice John Paul Stevens of the United States Supreme Court. He then spent four years at Caplin & Drysdale, a Washington, D.C. law firm. Throughout his professional and academic career, Lehman has volunteered his time and energy to nonprofit organizations that share his commitments in the fields of higher education, law, and technology.

Vice Chancellor Lehman received an undergraduate degree in mathematics from Cornell University, an M.P.P. from the University of Michigan, and a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School. He is a multi-award winner for his work both in the US and abroad, including the Friendship Award, which is China’s highest honor for “foreign experts who have made outstanding contributions to the country’s economic and social progress.” Lehman is also a recipient of an honorary doctorate from Peking University.

Please email JoAnn.Kim@nyu.edu to R.S.V.P. by Monday, November 28. Otherwise we cannot estimate the amount of food required. 

Nov
21
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Yun-chien Chang

Yun-chien Chang (NYU J.S.D. 2009)

Director, Empirical Studies, Institute of Law, Academia Sinica, Taiwan; expert in comparative property law.  Vanderbilt Hall  208 

Prof. Yun-chien Chang is an Associate Research Professor at Institutum Iurisprudentiae, Academia Sinica, Taiwan and serves as the Director of its Empirical Legal Studies Center. He was a visiting professor at the University of Chicago Law School, Cornell Law School, the law faculty at Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Haifa University, and Rotterdam Institute of Law and Economics. His current academic interests focus on economic, empirical and comparative analysis of property law and land use law, as well as empirical studies of the judicial system. Prof. Chang has authored and co-authored more than 70 journal articles and book chapters. His English articles have appeared or will appear in the The University of Chicago Law Review; Journal of Legal Studies; Journal of Legal Analysis; Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization; Journal of Empirical Legal StudiesNotre Dame Law Review; Iowa Law Review and the Supreme Court Economic Review, among others. 

His monograph Private Property and Takings Compensation: Theoretical Framework and Empirical Analysis (Edward Elgar; 2013) was a winner of the Scholarly Monograph Award in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Prof. Chang (co-)edited Empirical Legal Analysis: Assessing the Performance of Legal Institutions (Routledge; 2014), Law and Economics of Possession (Cambridge UP; 2015) and Private Law in China and Taiwan: Economic and Legal Analyses (Cambridge UP; 2016). Prof. Chang is also a co-author of Property and Trust Law in Taiwan (Wolter Kluwers; 2016). He authored two books in Chinese, Eminent Domain Compensation in Taiwan: Theory and Practice (Angle; 2013) and Economic Analysis of Property Law, Volume 1: Ownership (Angle; 2015), and also edited Empirical Studies of the Judicial Systems 2011 (Institutum Iurisprudentiae, Academia Sinica; 2013).

Prof. Chang’s academic achievements have won him the Career Development Award in 2016, Outstanding Scholar Award in 2016, Academia Sinica Law Journal Award in 2016, the Junior Research Investigators Award in 2015, the Best Poster Prize at 2011 CELS, and several research grants. He serves as Associate Editor of the International Review of Law and Economics; Editor of Asian Journal of Comparative Lawand a Panelist on American Law Institute’s Restatement Fourth, Property International Advisory Panel. 

Prof. Chang received his J.S.D. and LL.M. degree from New York University School of Law, where he was also a Lederman/Milbank Law and Economics Fellow and a Research Associate at the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy, NYU. Before going to NYU, Prof. Chang had earned LL.B. and LL.M. degrees at National Taiwan University and passed the Taiwan bar. Prof. Chang has had working experience with prestigious law firms in Taiwan and has served as a legal assistant for the International Trade Commission.

 

Nov
10
1:30 pm13:30

Implications of the Philippine Arbitration Award: An Informal Roundtable of Experts

  • Vanderbilt Hall, Greenberg Lounge

RSVP HERE

 

Implications of the Philippine Arbitration Award: An Informal Roundtable of Experts

Join the U.S.-Asia Law Institute and a panel of experts to discuss pressing issues regarding maritime law and the South China Sea. 

Location: 

Greenberg Lounge
Vanderbilt Hall (40 Washington Square South)
1:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Reception to follow

R.S.V.P here

Learn more about the Timothy A. Gelatt Memorial Dialogue Series here.

Agenda

1:30 pm Opening Address:
“A Path to a Just and Lasting Peace in the South China Sea”
Paul Reichler, Esq., Foley, Hoag Law Firm, Counsel for the Philippines

 2:00 pm Initial Discussion

Moderator: Jerome A. Cohen, Professor of Law and Director, US-Asia Law Institute, New York University 

2:15 pm Questions of Jurisdiction
Introductory Comments:

Bernard Oxman, Professor of Law and Director, Graduate Program in Maritime Law, University of Miami

Nong Hong, Ph.D. and Executive Director, Institute for China-America Studies

Group Discussion

Moderator: Peter Dutton, Professor of Strategic Studies and Director of the China Maritime Studies Institute, U.S. Naval War College

4:00 – 4:15 pm Coffee Break

4:15 pm When is an island entitled to an EEZ?
Introductory Comments:

Dustin Kuan-Hsiung Wang, Professor, National Taiwan Normal University
Henry Bensurto, Philippine Consul General in San Francisco

Michael McDevitt, Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy (Ret.), Senior Fellow, Center for Naval Analyses

Group Discussion
Moderator: Jerome A. Cohen

6:00 pm What’s Next?

Concluding Remarks: Peter Dutton

Contributing Discussants

Robert Harris, Assistant Legal Adviser for East Asia and Pacific Affairs, U.S. Department of State

Isaac Kardon, Instructor, U.S. Naval War College

Julian Ku, Professor of Law, Hofstra University

Lynn Kuok, Nonresident Fellow, Center for East Asia Policy Studies, The Brookings Institute

James Li, Professor of International Law, Tsinghua University School of Law, Beijing

6:15-6:45 pm Reception

RSVP HERE

Nov
7
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Benjamin Van Rooij

Benjamin van Rooij
Professor of U.S.-China Business and Law,
Director of UCI Long U.S.-China Institute

Monday, November 7, 2016
12:15-2:00 p.m., Vanderbilt Hall, Room 208
40 Washington Square South, NY, NY 10012
R.S.V.P. is required.

 

Benjamin van Rooij is the John S. and Marilyn Long Professor of U.S.-China Business and Law and director of the UCI Long U.S.-China Institute. By affiliation he is Professor of Chinese Law and Regulation at the Faculty of Law at Amsterdam University and director of the Netherlands China Law Centre. Also he is honorary professor at Wuhan University School of Law and long-term visiting professor at Yunnan University School of Law. In 2010, he was visiting faculty at New York University School of Law as a member of the Hauser Global Faculty.

Prof. van Rooij’s research focuses on implementation of law in comparative perspective. Since 2000 he has studied the implementability of legislation, regulatory law enforcement and compliance, and rights invocation and legal empowerment. A central theme is how implementation of law can be improved in the context of emerging markets where weak enforcement and widespread violations of law create a vicious circle undermining compliance. Using insights from sociology of law, criminology, political science and social psychology he uses anthropological methods to study compliance behavior and motivations and public and private enforcement practices. He uses innovative fieldwork data both to seek improvement to persistent implementation problems as well as to reorient existing regulatory, criminological and socio-legal theories that so far have yet to adapt to data from countries such as China.

Fields of law studies include environmental law, land law, labor law, food safety law, and taxation. His work has appeared in the The New York TimesLaw & PolicyLaw & Social Inquiry, and Regulation & Governance.

Prof. van Rooij has served as an adviser to the Dutch Prime Minister, the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment.

Please email JoAnn.Kim@nyu.edu to R.S.V.P. by Friday, November 4. Otherwise we cannot estimate the amount of food required. 

 

Oct
31
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Sida Liu

 

Sida Liu
Professor, University of Toronto Sociology Department; Distinguished Research Scholar at USALI; expert on China’s legal profession. 

Sida Liu is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto, Faculty Fellow at the American Bar Foundation, and a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton in 2016-2017. He received his LL.B. degree from Peking University Law School and his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. Professor Liu has conducted extensive empirical research on China’s legal reform and legal profession and published many articles in leading law and social science journals (in both English and Chinese). He is the author of two books in Chinese: The Lost Polis: Transformation of the Legal Profession in Contemporary China (Peking University Press, 2008) and The Logic of Fragmentation: An Ecological Analysis of the Chinese Legal Services Market (Shanghai Joint Publishing Co., 2011). His first English book (with Terence C. Halliday), Criminal Defense in China: The Politics of Lawyers at Work, will be published by Cambridge University Press in December 2016.

Please email JoAnn.Kim@nyu.edu to R.S.V.P. by Friday, October 28. Otherwise we cannot estimate the amount of food required. 


Vanderbilt Hall 208

 

Oct
18
6:00 pm18:00

China Town Hall: Local Connections, National Reflections. A Two Part Program.

Part I: Is China's Reform Era Ending?
Professor Carl Minzner, Fordham Law School in conversation with Professor Ira Belkin, NYU School of Law
6:00 - 7:00 pm

Lester Pollack Colloquium Room
Furman Hall

RSVP

China’s reform era is ending. Core factors that characterized it – political stability, ideological openness, and rapid economic growth – are unraveling. In part, this is the result of Beijing’s steadfast refusal to contemplate fundamental political reform. Since the early 1990s, this has fueled the rise of entrenched interests within the Communist Party itself. It has also contributed to the systematic underdevelopment of institutions of governance among state and society at large. Now, to address looming problems confronting the nation, Chinese leaders are progressively cannibalizing institutional norms and practices that have formed the bedrock of the regime's stability in the post-Mao era.

 

Part II: National Reflections with Henry Kissinger
7:00 - 8:00 pm
(via webcast)

RSVP 

Lester Pollack Colloquium Room
Furman Hall

 

Henry Alfred Kissinger was sworn in on September 22, 1973, as the 56th Secretary of State, a position he held until January 20, 1977. He also served as Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs from January 20, 1969, until November 3, 1975. In July 1983 he was appointed by President Reagan to chair the National Bipartisan Commission on Central America until it ceased operation in January 1985, and from 1984-1990 he served as a member of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board. From 1986-1988 he was a member of the Commission on Integrated Long-Term Strategy of the National Security Council and Defense Department. He has served as a member of the Defense Policy Board since 2001.

At present, Dr. Kissinger is Chairman of Kissinger Associates, Inc., an international consulting firm. He is also a member of the International Council of J.P. Morgan Chase & Co.; a Counselor to and Trustee of the Center for Strategic and International Studies; an Honorary Governor of the Foreign Policy Association; and an Honor Member of the International Olympic Committee. Among his other activities, Dr. Kissinger served as a member of the Board of Directors of ContiGroup Companies, Inc. from 1988-2014 and remains an Advisor to the Board, a position he also holds at American Express Company since 2005, after serving on the Board from 1984. He is also a Trustee Emeritus of the Metropolitan Museum of Art; a Director Emeritus of Freeport-McMoRan Copper and Gold Inc.; and a Director of the International Rescue Committee.

Among the awards Dr. Kissinger has received have been a Bronze Star from the U.S. Army in 1945; the Nobel Peace Prize in 1973; the Presidential Medal of Freedom (the nation’s highest civilian award) in 1977; and the Medal of Liberty (given one time to ten foreign-born American leaders) in 1986. Dr. Kissinger was born in Fuerth, Germany, came to the United States in 1938 and was naturalized a United States citizen in 1943. He served in the Army from 1943 to 1946. He graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College in 1950 and received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University in 1952 and 1954. From 1954 until 1969 he was a member of the faculty of Harvard University, in both the Department of Government and the Center for International Affairs. He was Director of the Harvard International Seminar from 1952 to 1969.

carlminzer.jpg

Carl Minzner is an associate professor of law at Fordham Law School in New York, specializing in Chinese law and politics.  He has previously taught at Washington University in St. Louis (2007-11), served as an international affairs fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (2006-07), and worked as senior counsel for the Congressional Executive Commission on China (2003-2006).  He also served as a Yale China Legal Education fellow at the Xibei Institute of Politics and Law in Xi’an.  He previously practiced intellectual property law in California for the Palo Alto firm of McCutchen & Doyle, then clerked for the Hon. Raymond Clevenger, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. His published works include articles on Chinese civil society, judicial reform, social unrest, and Communist Party management of judicial and government institutions.

Ira Belkin is the Executive Director of the U.S.-Asia Law Institute. Prior to joining the Institute in September 2012, Belkin served as a program officer at the Ford Foundation in Beijing, where he worked on law and rights issues. His grant-making supported Chinese institutions working to build the Chinese legal system, to strengthen the rule of law and to enhance the protection of citizens’ rights, especially the rights of vulnerable groups. Prior to joining the foundation in 2007, Belkin combined a career as an American lawyer and federal prosecutor with a deep interest in China, and spent seven years working to promote the rule of law in China. His appointments included two tours at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing and a year as a fellow at the Yale Law School China Law Center. After graduating from NYU Law, Belkin spent 16 years as a federal prosecutor including time in Providence, R.I., where he was chief of the criminal division, and in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he was deputy chief of the general crimes unit. Before attending law school, Belkin taught Chinese language at Middlebury College. He has lectured extensively in Chinese to Chinese audiences on the U.S. criminal justice system and to American audiences on the Chinese legal reform movement. In addition to his J.D. from New York University School of Law, Belkin has a master’s degree in Chinese studies from Seton Hall University and a bachelor’s degree from SUNY Albany.

Oct
17
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Nicholas Howson

Nicholas Howson

Professor, Michigan Law School; former Paul, Weiss partner; expert in China’s company law and legal history. 
 

Monday, October 17, 2016
12:15-2:00 p.m., Vanderbilt Hall, Room 208
40 Washington Square South, NY, NY 10012
R.S.V.P. is required.

Nicholas Calcina Howson is a Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School.  A former partner of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP, he worked out of that firm's New York, Paris, London and Beijing Offices, finally as a managing partner of the firm's Asia Practice based in the Chinese capital.  During this time, he acted for clients in precedent-setting transactions, including the first SEC-registered IPO and NYSE-listing by a PRC-domiciled issuer and the first private placement of shares to foreign interests in a newly privatized PRC company limited by shares and subsequent IPOs on the domestic Chinese capital markets.  Howson has also taught at the Berkeley (Boalt), Columbia, Cornell, and Harvard Law Schools, and served as a consultant to the Ford Foundation, the United Nations Development Programme, the Asian Development Bank, and the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences on Chinese law matters, and has advised the PRC legislature on the amendment of the PRC Company Law and the PRC Securities Law.  He acts regularly as a Chinese law expert or party advocate in U.S. and international litigations and/or U.S. government enforcement actions.  Professor Howson is a designated foreign arbitrator for the China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission in Beijing and the Shanghai International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission. 



Vanderbilt Hall 208 

Oct
10
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Mark Cohen

Mark Cohen

Adjunct Professor, Fordham Law School; Guest Professor, Renmin University; Senior Counsel, United States Patent and Trademark Office; America’s leading specialist in China’s intellectual property law. 

Vanderbilt Hall 208

Oct
6
12:15 pm12:15

Asia Law Weekly: Ping Xiong

Ping Xiong
University of South Australia (Adelaide) law professor, expert in China’s intellectual property law.
Thursday, October 6, 2016
12:15-2:00 pm, Furman Hall, Room 318

 

Dr. Ping Xiong is Senior Lecturer in law in the School of Law of the University of South Australia. Her research interest is in the field of international economic law with a focus on intellectual property policy in international trade, and its implications for free trade agreements and for international human rights protection. Dr. Xiong holds a PhD degree in law and a LLM degree. Prior to joining the UniSA Law School, Dr. Xiong held academic position at the Victoria University of Wellington. She also maintains a research interest in comparative law analysis concerning the Chinese legal system and the application of laws in China in relation to the requirements of international law. Dr. Xiong is also an associate member of the Centre for Asian Business.